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The Project of Ground-Up Building: Unilateral Implementation Processes and Limited Possibilities For Remedy

It seems that the Ground-Up Building project is the ultimatum of change that President Kais Saied wants. Although he did not mention it as a president so far, as a candidate, he referred to it briefly, and he did not receive a reaction from the political and intellectual sphere at the time, mainly because of the state of separation that this sphere is going through with regard to its surroundings, which led to ignoring the possibility of a similar project finding its way towards implementation. Perhaps this is the reason behind the support many expressed towards Kais Saied, believing that he is unable to change the rules of the political game, which until recently were in the hands of certain parties, converging and diverging according to their positions and interests.

By Khalil Arbi | 13 January 2022

The Right to Land: From Dispossession to Agrarian Reform

The right to land resides at the core of the agrarian question, as well as within the transformations that the rural field is being subjected to. Addressing this issue is a crucial step for Tunisia to achieve sovereign agricultural and food policy. Thus, it is important to trace the processes of land dispossession and recognize its repercussions on the rural field, food dependency and the country’s political plans to be able to put together a sustainable alternative.

By Aymen Amayed | 26 October 2021

The project of Ground-Up Building: A Utopia or an illusion in the midst of revolutionary and democratic processes

The Ground-Up Building project emerged at the end of 2011, with the start of the first campaign to boycott the National Constituent Assembly elections. The trio Kais Saied, Ridha Chiheb El Mekki “Lenin,” and Sonia Charbti formed the first nucleus of the project, which they called “Forces of Free Tunisia” joining, therefore, the professor of constitutional law

By Khalil Arbi | 26 October 2021

The rights of Sub-Saharan migrants in Tunisia

The precarious status of migrants labours in Tunisia is visible. Sub-Saharan migrants are over-represented in low paid service jobs such as assistant waiters, bathroom cleaners, or street and public space cleaners. Of the 53,000 foreigners that live in Tunisia, 12,000 are from sub-Saharan Africa[1]. Yet institutionally, these migrants are nowhere.

By Yasmine AKRIMI | 22 September 2021
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